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Aquaculture Marine Science

UK ANIMAL HEALTH MEDICINE FEARS OVER BREXIT

UK ANIMAL HEALTH MEDICINE FEARS OVER BREXIT

UK animal health medicine fears over Brexit.

The body representing Scottish food producers has called for urgent action from the UK government to resolve the impasse over Brexit.

At the same time, NOAH, which represents the UK animal health industry, is urging politicians to work together to agree an urgent resolution to Brexit negotiations in order to provide certainty for animal health businesses, including for farmed fish.

Responding to the vote on the Prime Minister’s Brexit deal, Food and Drink Federation Scotland (FDF) Chief Executive, Ian Wright CBE said: “The Prime Minister’s deal has been decisively rejected and it is now vital that the political leadership find a way to indicate what alternative should be pursued.

“We are calling for an extension to Article 50 in order for parliament to decide what our next steps are; whether that is a new deal, a referendum, an orderly exit from the EU without a deal at a later date, or a general election.

“The Government should now be looking to speak with representative organisations such as the FDF, to ensure they are pursuing an alternative that prevents further damage to the UK’s wider economy.”

Meanwhile, NOAH is urging politicians to work together to agree an urgent resolution to Brexit negotiations in order to provide certainty for animal health businesses, including for farmed fish.

Companies are working hard to finalise plans to protect and ensure supply of vital veterinary medicines within the UK, as 29 March rapidly approaches.

“Leaving the EU without a deal will present a serious risk to the seamless supply of the medicines our animals need to protect their health and prevent disease and suffering, despite the extensive preparation our members have been carrying out to prepare for the many Brexit scenarios that have been under discussion,” NOAH Chief Executive Dawn Howard explained.

“We need a decision to be made that means that we do not leave the EU on 29 March without a transition period. Should ‘no deal’ prevail, then it is vital that government guarantees veterinary medicines are given the same customs priority afforded to human medicines. Many vital medicines, including vaccines, have short shelf lives and specific transport conditions. They must not be caught up in potential backlogs with other commodity goods.

“Our members look forward to continuing to work with Government and the authorities to the best of their ability to help protect the nation’s animals by ensuring medicines are available, whatever the final outcome of deliberations,” she added. “We await the next stage in the process.”

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