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ASK FOR AUSSI SEAFOOD THIS EASTER SAYS SIA

ASK FOR AUSSI SEAFOOD THIS EASTER SAYS SIA

Ask for Aussie seafood this Easter says SIA. In Australia, Easter and seafood go together like crispy beer battered fish and tartare sauce, chucking a couple of prawns on a hot BBQ, or loading up “adult Easter eggs”, aka caviar, on pumpernickel with a dollop of sour cream. But, before you dish up your fish Seafood Industry Australia (SIA) has reminded consumers to “Ask for Aussie seafood” this Easter.

“Seafood is one of the biggest highlights of Easter and that means serving up the freshest, finest quality Aussie products to enjoy with family and friends,” SIA CEO Jane Lovell said.

“Good Friday has long been associated with eating seafood and is one of the busiest days of the year for fishmongers with popular choices this year tipped to include barramundi, snapper and of course, prawns.

“Although it has its roots in religion, eating seafood on Good Friday has become somewhat of a cultural practice here in Australia, and it’s no wonder why. We are lucky to have access to fresh, delicious and sustainable seafood right here on our doorstep.ASK FOR AUSSI SEAFOOD THIS EASTER SAYS SIA

“Consumers can be confident that the Aussie seafood they are enjoying is managed and caught using responsible and sustainable methods.

“After Christmas, Easter is the second highest consumption period for seafood and is a busy time for fishmongers. Australia’s commercial fishers have been working hard in the lead up to the Easter to ensure we have access to the world class seafood we’ve been looking forward to for weeks.

“This Easter Aussies have a fantastic supply of seafood to put on their tables. While availability has varied due to weather events, most species are now able to be found. However, if you’re stuck ask your fishmonger for a recommendation. They’re always happy to help and you could just find a lesser known, often cheaper species will become a new staple.

“To ensure you don’t miss out on fresh Aussie seafood this Easter it’s always a good idea to place an order with your fishmonger early, so hop to it and remember to ‘Ask for Aussie seafood’.”

Popular Easter species expected price range

SPECIESPrice range $ per kg
Barramundi (Whole)14-17
Barramundi (Fillets)30-33
Eastern School Whiting9-12
Silver Trevally11
Ocean Jacket9-10
Snapper (Whole) Small17-20
Flathead (Fillets)34-40
Yellowtail Kingfish (Whole)20-24

Pricing via Sydney Fish Market.
Seafood availability around Australia this Easter

Sydney Fish Market

  • More than 50,000 visitors are expected at Sydney Fish Market this Good Friday, their busiest day of the year.
  • To give Sydneysiders and international visitors the perfect oppor-tuna-ty to snap up their seafood favourites, Sydney Fish Market will open its doors for extended trading hours on Good Friday. Opening at 5.00am on Friday 19 April, trading will continue through to 5.00pm to accommodate the remarkable 650 tonnes of seafood expected to be sold throughout the day.
  • With more than 100 species of seafood available.
  • “Traditionally, fish such as Barramundi and Salmon are favourites, however, this year we encourage families to try something new. Australian fish like Mirror Dory, Eastern School Whiting, or Silver Trevally are great alternatives as they are in abundance around Easter, so they make for very affordable and sustainable options,” Sydney Fish Market General Manager Bryan Skepper said.
  • The Easter period coincides with the annual “Mullet run” which occurs along the East Coast of Australia. This spectacle is when large numbers of Sea Mullet begin their migration north very close to the shore. Sea Mullet are at their best eating during this time of year, making them an affordable and delicious option for an Easter feast.

Queensland Seafood Marketers Association

  • “We are having a bumper prawn season in Queensland, including in the Gulf of Carpentaria,” Queensland Seafood Marketers Association president Marshall Betzel said.
  • “It’s a fairly big Banana Prawn season in The Gulf, and the Tiger and King Prawn season along the East Coast of Queensland has been quite plentiful,” Queensland Seafood Marketers Association president Marshall Betzel said.
  • “There is going to be good quantities of good quality prawns on the market this Easter and prices will be extremely attractive,” Queensland Seafood Marketers Association president Marshall Betzel said.
  • “It’s been quite a good Mud Crab season in Queensland thanks to plenty of rain and the return to what we would consider a ‘normal wet season’,” Queensland Seafood Marketers Association president Marshall Betzel said.
  • “Queensland Saucer Scallops are abundant and are at record low-prices with half-shells going for about $10 per dozen. People should consider a dozen half-shell scallops baked in a hot oven with some butter and garlic; delicious,” Queensland Seafood Marketers Association president Marshall Betzel said.

Australian Barramundi Farmers Association

  • “While available all year round, Australian barramundi farmers are preparing for their biggest harvests of the year in time for Easter,” Australian Barramundi Farmers Association Executive Officer Jo-Anne Ruscoe said.
  • “Australian fresh barramundi fillets range in price from $29 kg from the supermarket, to $44 per kg from specialist seafood retailers. Or, about $8 for a perfect skin on, boneless 200g fillet,” Australian Barramundi Farmers Association Executive Officer Jo-Anne Ruscoe said.
  • “Remember to ask for Aussie Barra,” Australian Barramundi Farmers Association Executive Officer Jo-Anne Ruscoe said.

Seafood Industry Victoria

  • “Victorians should keep an eye out for local Lakes Entrance prawns, noting these are coming to the end of the season so get them while they last,” Seafood Industry Victoria Executive Director Johnathon Davey said.
  • “Given it’s Easter and there is a plentiful supply of seafood, which our entire supply chain is working tirelessly to provide, why not try something different? Give some leatherjacket, octopus or sardines a try. There’s plenty of under-utilised species available that will truly make your mouth water,” Seafood Industry Victoria Executive Director Johnathon Davey said.

Australian Prawn Farmers Association

  • “Fresh, cooked Australian Farmed Tiger Prawns are in season with strong supply,” Australian Prawn Farmers Association Executive Officer Kim Hooper said.
  • “This Easter, we have seen ideal growing conditions, excellent quality and larger sizes in abundant volumes,” Australian Prawn Farmers Association Executive Officer Kim Hooper said.
  • “Look in store for the brightly orange coloured prawns and the grown in Australia label,” Australian Prawn Farmers Association Executive Officer Kim Hooper said.
  • Fresh and thawed farmed Australian Prawns have a plentiful supply and consumers can expect a similar pricing to last Easter,” Australian Prawn Farmers Association Executive Officer Kim Hooper said.
  • “Australian prawns are high in protein, but low in calories,” Australian Prawn Farmers Association Executive Officer Kim Hooper said.
  • “Australian Prawns are a great when camping, or entertaining friends and family over Easter,” Australian Prawn Farmers Association Executive Officer Kim Hooper said.
  • You can visit the Love Australian Prawns website for easy to prepare recipes on australianprawns.com.au/recipes.

Northern Territory Seafood Council

  • “Supply has been fantastic, consistency has variety due to weather, but fishers have been working hard to meet retailer demand,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.
  • “Cheaper smaller portions – Barra wings sitting at between $10 to $10.50 per kg with Mix wings (which includes threadfin, Rock Cod and saddletail, goldband snapper being priced at $9.50 per kg.  NT caught Whole Saddletail ranging from $12.50-$14per kg, Spanish Mackerel cutlets $25-30 per kg,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.
  • Retailers still have the good old favourites:
    • Fillets – skin off
    • Goldband snapper $37-41.50 per kg
    • Crimsion snapper $30-32 per kg
    • Rock cod $36-37 per kg
  • “If you’re looking for skin-on, for something a little different, just ask,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.
  • Still popular on tables over Easter:
    • Coffin Bay Oysters – $21-22 dozen
    • Green U6/8 Tiger prawns have been favourable and have been in higher demand $50 per kg
    • We will see more stock arrive before Easter of the green King prawn $ 55per Kg and U8 tiger prawn $59.95 per kg
    • Prawns – cooked
      • Tigers  $36-38per kg
      • Banana $38 per kg
  • “Heading into Easter has seen a surge in the purchase of both NT cuttlefish $19.95 per kg and squid which is not always available from the NT, and do stock SA squid $33 per kg,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.
  • “We have also seen difficulty in sourcing NT crab due to the slow start to the season, we should see a change in supply come May. This is also due to weather and the challenging time in the Gulf of Carpentaria. When in stock do range from $43-45 per kg live,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.
  • “Hot this year is the wild caught barramundi $ 37-40per kg and threadfin 27-30 per kg with the season really just starting is in demand with local, interstate FIO and visitors some making purchases of 3-5kg to take back home,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.
  • “We are fortunate in Darwin to be living in an unpolluted region, surrounded by pristine oceans that provides an incredible resource for organic, harvested seafood that is unsurpassed,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.
  • “Northern Territory you will find not only chocolate but seafood at the heart of many Territorians,” Northern Territory Seafood Council CEO Katherine Winchester said.

Western Australian Fishing Industry Council

  • “Easter is traditionally a time when the community enjoys seafood for family celebrations. This year, we urge consumers to purchase locally caught or grown seafood,” Western Australian Fishing Industry Council CEO John Harrison said.
  • “If it has the ‘Western Australian’ label, you can be assured that you will be eating quality seafood from world-class managed fisheries,” Western Australian Fishing Industry Council CEO John Harrison said.
  • “A misconception is that home-grown or caught seafood is expensive – it doesn’t have to be. There are a variety of sensational seafood options available to consumers in shops at the moment including lesser known species like: mullet, herring and sardines,” Western Australian Fishing Industry Council CEO John Harrison said.
  • “Our advice is to experiment and have fun in the kitchen, knowing your cooking with seafood sourced from WA’s premium sustainable fisheries,” Western Australian Fishing Industry Council CEO John Harrison said.

“When you purchase local, you are supporting the WA economy including hundreds of businesses and jobs,” Western Australian Fishing Industry Council CEO John Harrison said.

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